header image header image Login header image Help header image News header image My Account
History From Heasdstones Logo

Kilwarlin Moravian Graveyard

Surnames


spacer
spacerspacer
Occurences of surnames found in the graveyard
spacerList of Ministers who served at Kilwarlin

The surname table to the left, indicates the distribution of the primary surnames recorded throughout the graveyard*. There are 28 individual primary surnames recorded in the cemetery, the top 6 most common (those highlighted red) make up for 52% of the names recorded, showing the high concentration of those families in the Kilwarlin area. The remaining 22 surnames recorded only make up 48% of the total.

 

The most common surname in the graveyard is Scandrett, which is recorded on 11 separate headstones; this does not include the variation, Scandrett-Blythe. Scandrett is normally an extremely uncommon name and it is interesting to see a large concentration in the cemetery and that area of County Down. This surname is found in the West of England.

 

English Surnames are prevalent in the cemetery, with the names, Bell, Benson, Black, Blandford [var. Blanford], Blythe, Eadham, Green, Law, Moxon, Titterington, Walker and Walsh. Out of the 28 Surnames recorded in the Graveyard, 15 could be classed as predominantly English names. There are 2 extremely unusual surnames to be found, Pasche possibly German or French, and one from Greek origin, Zula. Also note the high number of English surnames of the Ministers of the Church 1834-1921, in the relevant table to the left.

 

There are also at least 5 accounts of inter-marriage between the members of the congregation, which would be common in a small close-knit community. Bell - Law, Walsh - Green, McLeavy - Scandrett, Titterington - Bell and Walker - Titterington marriages. There is evidence in some marriage registers of inter-marriage between the other Moravian churches, mainly, University Street, Belfast; Gracehill and Newry Churches.

 

* Distribution for Primary Surnames recorded in the Graveyard, other names that are recorded on the gravestones are not included in the figures.

 

spacer

Gender


spacer
spacerspacer
Graph showing gender

In the pie chart to the right, you will see the high proportion of women that are buried in Kilwarlin graveyard. Almost two thirds of the graves, 62% are for women. This is an unusually high imbalance as the gender split would normally be between 50% and 53% in favour of women. This is probably due to the men of the congregation having to move away from the area in search of work.

 

The graph below represents the age at death.  The highest death rate is recorded within the age ranges 0-2 and 81+.  This peak in the number of deaths between 0-2 shows the high infant mortality, which affected the Kilwarlin congregation.  The 12 references to infant deaths are marked with a symbol.  There are a number of graves that have 2 infants buried in them; Anne Georgina & Samuel John Bell; Alice Jane Scandrett McLeavy & Thomas James McLeavy; 2 unnamed infants in the grave of Alexander Titterington and Thomas & Lilian Jemima Walker.  The numbers of death remains quite low between the ages of 3-15, but with a sudden rise in the number of deaths in the 16-20 age range.  Incidences of death drop in the early twenties when people would be considered to be stronger and fitter.  Numbers remains steady, until it again rises in the late 50s age range.  The number of deaths peaks once more in the 81+ age range undoubtedly due to old age.  The oldest person buried in the graveyard is Edward James Law who died aged 89.

spacer
spacer
Graph showing the age at death
spacer
spacer
Website designed by BRSsystems